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June 2014 Issue: Art Song!

Click above to read our June issue on Art Song! We have some really excellent pieces, including interviews with Dawn Upshaw, Nathan Gunn, and Nicholas Phan!

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The Gypsy ‘Other’ in Opera

Full Issue

By Ilana Walder-Biesanz 

*Author’s note- “ Until someone pointed it out in comments, I had no idea the term ‘gypsy’ was sometimes considered a slur. That said, I do think it is the right term to use in this case for the reasons the asker of the question alludes to. This is the word used by both the opera librettists/composers and the academics whose work I drew on in writing the article. For me to use a different word would imply a transference of these stereotypes and literary history onto a more particularly and accurately defined ethnic group, which was not intended by those original writers and composers.”

From Carmen twirling her skirts and tossing flowers to Azucena’s horrible revenge, portrayals of gypsies appear often in opera. These representations are built on stereotypes rather than reality, but the reality is not so easy to define. Because gypsies are a geographically scattered ethnic group with various languages and no written historical tradition, even purportedly anthropological accounts are based on outsiders’ observations. These frequently conflict and are inevitably romanticized. The anthropologist of the nineteenth century (when gypsy studies became popular) looked for (and sometimes even invents) differences that would delight his readers. Following the literary currents of Romanticism, he rejected industrialism and searched for the exotic in ‘primitive’ pre- industrial cultures. As a result, the gypsies of both pseudoscience and fiction are mysterious, potentially alluring, and always dangerous ‘Others’ who defy the norms of the West and its civilizing influence. 

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New Bass in Town: Interview with Soloman Howard

Full Issue

By Jennifer Choi

Last month, I attended a performance of Der Rosenkavalier at The Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. I had bought the tickets because Renée Fleming was singing the Marschallin, and while her Marschallin lived up to all of the hype, I remember being particularly impressed by the exceptional talent of the young supporting singers. Soloman Howard sang the role of the notary and the police inspector that night, and he dazzled the audience with his commanding voice and stage presence. After being accepted into the Domingo Cafritz Young Artists Program in 2010, Howard has been taking the opera world by storm. 

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Madame Butterfly and Ethnicity: Failure of Cultural Cohesion

Full Issue

By Gregory Moomjy 

As opera lovers, we are very familiar with Butterfly’s suicide from Puccini’s Madama Butterfly. We realize that after having remained constant to her philandering husband, she puts their son in his care and, with nothing left for her, kills herself using the traditional Japanese method of seppuku. Presumably this is because she is still in love with Pinkerton and wants to die honorably. At first glance, this makes sense. Puccini is an unabashedly sentimental composer who wrote such romantic works as La Bohème and Tosca, and what could be more romantic than a young woman giving her life for the man she loves, even if he no longer loves her? However, on closer inspection, we realize that the reasons behind Madama Butterfly’s iconic ending go far beyond romantic ideals. Rather, Butterfly’s suicide is a commentary on race relations, rooted in politics contemporary to Puccini’s Japan. 

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A Brief Survey of Opera and Black Identity

Full Issue

By Adam Matlock 

Opera has never had an easy relationship with race. The canon is full of White and Western centered stories about non-White, non-Western themes and characters, and the result is often ridden with stereotypes, problematic tropes, and clumsy musical imitation of the culture of choice. As opera has modernized, seeing contributions from composers and librettists of color as well as diverse casts and production staff, the expectations created by this problematic history has often been left on the shoulders of creators of color, unfairly influencing expectations of their work, and if or how their identity will play into their work. Black American composers must also reconcile with Jazz and Blues, or those genres’ folk predecessors, or risk having their authenticity questioned. In this article I use the term Black American as opposed to the more accepted term African American. I do so for two reasons; first, as a way of acknowledging the unique fluidity of the identity of the African diaspora in North America under chattel slavery and after it; and second to acknowledge how that experience has informed the aesthetic and thematic fluidity of music by Black Americans in a way that is visible across style and genre lines. This fluidity, and the challenge it creates in categorizing Black American music by its participants and observers alike, often results in questions of authenticity coming from within and without. By examining three operas written by Black American composers - Treemonisha, by Scott Joplin, X: The Life and Times of Malcolm X by Anthony Davis, and Trillium E by Anthony Braxton - I will examine how those questions of authenticity are often negated, if not in easily identifiable musical connections, then in thematic strategies that pepper both the musical and narrative elements of these works. 

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June Issue: Art Song

Hello everybody!  Our June issue will be on “Art Song,” and the deadline is May 31st.  Make sure you follow the submission guidelines if you plan to submit something.

Also this (please ignore my gross typo - “about out” should be “shout out”):

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Note from Jen + Announcements

I hope everyone is enjoying this beautiful spring weather (fall for the friends in the Southern Hemisphere)! I have a couple of notes and announcements.

First some exciting encouragement! I was backstage after a performance of Der Rosenkavalier in DC last month, and I chatted with Renée Fleming about Opera21. To sum up, she was so encouraging about everything we do at Opera21. She said how she loves what we do and that we should keep up the good work! I wanted to share this with everyone, since we’re a big collaborative effort and Opera21 wouldn’t be possible without all of you lovely guys who read, write, and follow us.

On that note, our April issue on Race and Ethnicity in Opera will be coming out this week, so keep your eyes peeled! (That’s such a gross saying…)

Finally, our June issue will be on Art Song. If you’re interested in submitting something for the June issue, go check the Submission Guidelines at the top. The deadline for submissions is May 31st.

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